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port wine

New York Times distinguishes Oporto as a ‘Place to Go’

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New York Times distinguishes Oporto as a ‘Place to Go’

According to the prestigious New York Times newspaper, the northern Portuguese city of Oporto is one of the ’46 Places to go in 2013’ – “whether you travel to eat or shop, surf or ski, new adventures await.”

Oporto ranks 28th on the NYT’s list of the top-46 destinations of 2013, chosen for its quality for price, its architecture, and, of course, its port.

Portugal’s economic pain is your gain in Oporto, one of Western Europe’s great bargains. New boutique hotels and restaurants, like the Yeatman, dramatically perched above the Douro River featuring Oporto’s first Michelin-starred restaurant, have brought a fresh burnish to this Unesco-protected city where labyrinthine narrow streets, ancient buildings and black-cloaked students inspired a young English tutor who lived here in the early 1990s named J. K. Rowling”, the author writes.

Wedged between Chang-baishan (China), at 27th, and Puerto Rico in 29th, Oporto is also praised for its most famous export; “The financial downturn doesn’t detract from the city’s most prominent industry — port wine — which can be sampled in the cellars of Sandeman, Graham’s or Taylor-Fladgate with a terraced restaurant, on the Douro’s south bank.”

Topping the NYT’s list of 46 destinations to see this year is Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, “Because the whole world will be there in 2014”; the Mediterranean port town of Marseille (France) comes in second, and rounding off the top-three places to visit this year is Nicaragua, central America, for its new high-end lodges and up-and-coming food scene.

Source: http://www.vivainportugal.pt

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The Place Behind the Port: Diving into the Douro Valley

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The Place Behind the Port: Diving into the Douro Valley

Do you remember as a kid in the playground, climbing to the top of a slide and looking down to the bottom, thinking how high up you were? Well, standing at the top of any of the near-vertical vineyards in Portugal’s Douro Valley is a similar sensation!

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The Douro Valley runs west to east, 70km inland from the coastal city of Porto, and sits along the winding Douro River. The scenery in the valley is some of the most spectacular I’ve ever seen in a wine region. Not only because of the precipitous nature of the vineyards, which are striking in their own right, but also as you stand on the top of a vineyard and look around, you see a kaleidoscope of shades of green much like tiles of quilt, made up of individual plots of vines, olive trees and shrubbery, all tied together by the meandering jade coloured river.

It is from these vineyards that some excellent red table wines are produced along with one of the world’s most revered wines, Port, for which the region is renowned.

Demarcating the Douro Valley

The Douro Valley is one of Europe’s oldest demarcated wine regions, meaning there have been regulations in place for over 300 years to protect the styles of wine produced there. It was back in 1756 that the Marquis de Pombal, then Prime Minister, instituted a sequence of actions to standarize the sales of Port, and amongst many of the things he did, was restrict the area within which the grapes planted for Port production could be grown.

There are three distinct regions within the demarcated area of the Douro Valley and we visited all three on a recent trip. Every quinta (farm) that produces port, or dry table wines, must be located within one of the 21 municipalities within these three areas. As I tried not to get car sick as we wound our way along narrow mountain roads and around stomach-churning hair-pin curves, we discovered that each of the 3 areas produce wines of different styles.

The vineyards in Baixo (by-sho) Corgo receive the most rainfall and therefore produce a lighter style of wine with less ageing potential that are used mainly for cost-effective, entry level ruby ports. As I tried not to get car sick as we wound our way along narrow mountain roads and around stomach-churning hair-pin curves, we discovered that each of the 3 areas produce wines of different styles. The vineyards in Baixo (by-sho) Corgo receive the most rainfall and therefore produce a lighter style of wine with less ageing potential that are used mainly for cost-effective, entry level ruby ports.

In the middle of the valley lies the Cima (see-ma) Corgo. A few of the wines produced here will become dry wine, but most are used for some of the region’s best ports, including Late Bottled Vintages and many of the premium vintage ports.

Vineyards in the Douro Valley

The Douro Superior, on the very eastern end of the valley, close to the Spanish border, has numerous vineyards whose grapes are destined for port, but its main claim to fame is it produces the best dry wines of the trio.

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As you can imagine, harvesting these extremely steep vineyards is not easy. Historically, when the vineyards were first planted, two or three rows were grown horizontally across the hillside on terraces. These were similar to large steps carved into the hillsides and built with the support of high brick walls. This worked well enough, but the vineyards had to be harvested by hand as they were too narrow for a tractor to pass between them.

Terraced vineyards still exist, but these days you will also see two other types of vineyard orientation: ‘patamares’ and ‘up-and-down’. Patamares are the modern answer to terraces. The vines are still planted horizontally across the hill, but there are no more walls, instead the rows of vines are connected by sloping ramps which are wide enough for a tractor to drive through.

The third style of vineyard you’ll see amongst the patchwork scenery, is the most common in other wine regions – the multiple rows or ‘up-and-down’ plantings. Tractors can rarely scale such heights, so these have to be harvested by hand by pickers who, while doing the back-breaking work, also have the added degree of difficulty of trying to keep their balance! We got out into the vineyards and tried our hand at picking grapes which was great fun for about the first 20 minutes, any longer and you start to wonder if you’ll ever be able to stand upright again!

One piece of advice I’d offer if you ever go to the Douro Valley, (do it if you can!) – travel as often as possible by boat or train, instead of driving along the winding roads by car, not only because of the tasting you’ll be doing at the quintas you visit, but, because experiencing the landscape from these different vantage points is exhilarating and it will prevent you from turning as green as the river, like I did!

Rating Douro Wines

A fact about the vineyards in the Douro, which I found interesting and that very few wine drinkers are aware of, is that they are classified by a rigorous rating system. The better the vineyard site, the better the rating, the better the perks for the winemakers.

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There are twelve features that are taken into account and points allotted, based on such elements as aspect, exposure to sunlight, soil density, gradient, age of vines – and according to Quinta do Tedo owner, Vincent Bouchard, the most important element in attaining a high rating is the vineyard location.

So what are the benefits of having a good rating? The main one is that quintas with the highest scores are allowed to make more wine that those with a lesser grade which means they’ll have more to sell.

Vineyards are given a score between A-F, and only about 2-2.5% of the vineyards have top ratings of A or B, the majority fall into the C and D categories. This doesn’t mean the wine are inferior, just that there’s not as much of it.

Grapes of the Douro Valley

We’ve talked a lot about the vineyards so far, so now let’s take a look at the grapes themselves. Incredibly there are over 90 varieties growing in the Douro and all of them are permitted for use in the port blend as stipulated by the Port and Douro Wine Institute (IVDP), which is charged with overseeing the modernized regulations set forth by the Marquis de Pombal.

Through several series of tests over the years, five grape varieties have been recognized as the ones best suited to Port production (many of which you’ll also see on the labels of bottles of dry wine from Portugal). They are: Touriga Nacional, Touriga Franca, Tinta Roriz (Tempranillo in Spain), Tinto Cão and Tinta Barroca, but there are many others used including Sausão, Tinta Amarella and Tinta Carvalha.

Historically vineyards were planted with a mixture of varieties all growing in amongst each other, to the point where even the growers weren’t sure exactly which ones they had on their land! This is still the case today and such vineyards are known as ‘field blends’. We picked grapes in a field blend and to our untrained eyes all the grapes looked the same – they were purple! But on closer inspection, the size of the berries varied slightly and when you crushed the grapes between your fingers and rubbed the skins together, some had dark, staining skins while others were juicy and pulpy with barely any colour at all.

Many of the newer vineyards are planted with just one variety simply in order to ensure all the grapes reach maturity by harvest time, since not all grapes in a field blend are as ready to be harvested as others.

The Extreme Douro Valley Climate

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One thing all the varieties grown in the Douro Valley have in common is their ability to withstand extremely warm temperatures. Summer in the Douro can see the mercury rise to over 40˚C for days at a time. Manuel de Novaes Cabral, President of the IVDP, describes the climate in the Douro as “9 months of winter and 3 months of hell!”.

Even though we visited at the end of September when the weather is usually still very hot, we got an early dose of winter with windy, cool conditions and didn’t experience the savage summer heat. It is the unbearable high temperatures that compelled Port shippers in the 18th century to send the wines away from the Douro Valley to age. They wanted to avoid the roasted characters, known as the ‘Douro bake’, that are associated with wine matured in the oppressive heat. The spring after the harvest the wines were always shipped down to the coast and the town of Vila Nova de Gaia, which lies across the river from Porto near the Atlantic coast.

‘Gaia’, as it’s referred to, may be considered the spiritual home of Port. Even though no wine is actually made there, the city is intrinsically tied to the Douro Valley, not just by the winding thread of the river, but because up until a couple of decades ago, every bottle of port produced in the Douro Valley had to be exported from the city of Gaia.

The Famed Port Lodges

We walked around the town amongst some of the vast lodges (cellars) owned by the big port shippers like Taylor’s, Cockburns, Grahams, Ramos Pinto, Sandeman, enjoying views of the long, slender Rabelo boats that used to bring the wine from the valley down to Gaia, before trains took over. We paid a visit to Taylor’s and saw the hundreds upon hundreds of barrels of port of all shapes and sizes resting in Gaia’s moderate climate, which unlike the heat of the valley, is ideal for ageing these special wines.

Until only a few decades ago, all the wine made in the Douro Valley had to be sold and shipped from Gaia, meaning many of the 32,500 winemakers had no choice but to sell their entire production to one of the big shippers who could afford to own a lodge in Gaia. Thankfully this restriction was lifted in 1986 and people like the fabulous, young, passionate Oscar Quevdeo can now ship his family’s wines directly from the Douro Valley, which is great for them and even better for us!

The Douro Valley and the cities of Porto and Vila Nova de Gaia are fascinating – dramatic and striking is the landscape, alive and enthusiastic is the passion of everyone involved with port production (and almost everyone is in one way or another!) and steeped in tradition yet contemporary and refined is the wine.

There is great history and pride in every bottle of port and dry wine from the Douro Valley and whether you drink one in the steep vineyards or at home with friends, each one brings us a sense of pleasure in much the same way as slithering down that slide gave us as a kid.

Source: www.catavino.net

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Food & Wine: Any Port in a storm

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Food & Wine: Any Port in a storm

By Robert Rabine

It’s finally getting cold and the holidays are here. Now is the perfect time to snuggle up next to the fire with a good glass of fortified red wine from the Douro Valley. A glass of what? From where? Port…you know, from Portugal.

When I was younger I had two misconceptions about port: (1) I used to think it gave me a hangover from all the sugar. Wrong. It was from all the assorted cocktails and glasses of wine I drank before actually getting to the port. (2) They added alcohol to port because the Portuguese wine itself was so bad. Well, not exactly. Initially, in the 1690s, they added a small amount of aguardente (similar to brandy) to plain red wine to stabilize it for shipping. Port was established as a protected appellation in 1756, but by the early 1800s the product had evolved into something quite different. Gradually, they began adding the aguardente to the barrels to stop fermentation while the wine was still sweet and strong (20 percent alcohol). It eventually became something similar to today’s port.

It’s called port because it was always shipped from the seaside city of Porto on the Atlantic coast of Portugal. Which is weird, if you think about it. That would be like calling all wine from Napa Valley “San Mateo.” Port is actually grown and bottled in the hot, dry Douro Valley along the Douro River in northeastern Portugal. There are three sub-appellations that make different types of port reflecting their distinct terroirs. Most inexpensive ruby and tawny ports come from the Baixo (lower) Corgo. Tawny ports are barrel-aged and allow for considerable oxidation and evaporation in the barrel; hence their brownish color and somewhat nutty flavor. The Cima (upper) Corgo is hotter and gets less rainfall. It produces the best bottle-aged vintage and ruby ports. These are characterized by their bright color and freshness.

More fun facts: The grapes used in red ports are usually a blend of five or six varieties, both indigenous (like touriga nacional) and imports (like tempranillo). There are also white and rose ports. A LBV, or late bottle vintage, has spent more time in the barrel before being bottled due to lack of demand. Serve port at around 63 degrees Farenheit. The glass should be around 4 ounces and have a small bowl with sides that angle inward, like a shorter, fatter champagne flute. Vintage ports can be incredibly long lived. Always decant older ports, but drink them right away. The individual port houses – like Dow, Warres, Cockburn – decide when to declare the year a “vintage” year-meaning worthy of aging, but it must be approved by the Institute of Port. It’s in Lisbon. Not surprisingly, I have actually been there.

Source: shorelinetimes.com

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Tom Cannavan’s wine selection

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Tom Cannavan’s wine selection

After much hype and anticipation, Tom Cannavan’s 50 Great Portuguese wines selection was finally unveiled in London at the Portuguese Ambassador’s Residence in Belgrave Square.

 

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A lady’s choice, Portuguese Wine in the feminine

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A lady’s choice, Portuguese Wine in the feminine

Portugal is a country of passions. Some say that Lisbon is the last romantic city in the world, our coast is one of the most beautiful in all Europe, our gastronomy sinful, our culture and heritage admirable, and our people gentle.  But it’s our wine that gets the most attention and drives the biggest passion of all.

The Portuguese wine industry has come a long way from traditional production just 15 years ago to the development of highly sophisticated wines from all regions which are now competing with the best and most prestigious wines from countries around the world including South Africa, Australia and France.

Like football, when it comes to Portuguese Wine everybody has a word to say. In the North, Port Wine is famous and graces the after dinner table in the finest restaurants and homes around the world. Sir Cliff Richards was not a pioneer in the production of Algarve Wines but he has definitely help to increase the visibility of the Portuguese wine industry and to promote the Algarve as a wine region.

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When it comes to the wine it’s not a man’s world any more. The natural growth and influence of women in today’s society is reflected in many aspects of our life, and the wine sector is no exception. Women buy more wine than men. An online survey conducted by Wine Spectator in 2009 concerning women and wine concluded that 93% of the respondents drank wine at least once a week and 80% of the time during meals. Having wine during a meal defiantly helps to promote the wine culture as an integral accompaniment to food. The survey also found that 79% of women prefer red wine to white or rose. This was quite surprising as it goes against the stereotype of women usually preferring white wine. And when it comes to loyalty to a particular brand the survey concluded that 65% of the time women would try a new wine rather than buy a wine they have had before and enjoyed.

Sarah Ahmed is known as the Wine Detective. She’s an independent, award-winning wine writer with a particular passion for Portuguese wines. Her main areas of expertise are Australian wines, the wines of the Loire region, South African wines and of course Portuguese wines. Anyone familiar with wine will recognize Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc as the dominant grape varieties. Sarah however became fascinated by the glittering array of over 300 native grape varieties plantedacross some thirty wine regions across Portugal.  The result as she says is “a rich kaleidoscope of unique flavours, textures and aromas”. According to this Wine Detective “Portugalis really exciting because winemaking bravado wed to viticulture excellence is unleashing the full potential of these diverse grape varieties and regions”. As a writer passionate about Portuguese wines she feels a certain frustration to encounter so many unsung heroes – producers, wine styles or regions – yet to make their mark.

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Sarah Ahmed was honoured with the invitation to select the line up for the annual Fifty Great Portuguese Wines press and trade tasting in 2010. This was a fantastic opportunity for her to showcase Portugal’s dynamic and diverse wine scene.  The list of wines chosen for the tasting are listed below and having tasted some of them we recommend you have a taste of your own.

White

    * Quinta do Chocapalha Arinto 2008

    * Quinta de Ameal Loureiro 2008

    * Anselmo Mendes Contacto Alvarinho 2008

    * Quinta do Louridal Poema Alvarinho 2007

    * Soalheiro Primeiras Vinhas Alvarinho 2008

    * Vale d’Algares Seleccion White

    * Quinta das Bágeiras Vinho Branco Garrafeira 2007

    * Quinta do Cardo Siria 2008 

    * Quinta dos Currais Colheita Seleccionado 2007

    * Quinta de Saes Reserva Branco 2008

    * Poeira Pó de Poeira Branco 2008

    * Niepoort Reserva Redoma Branco 2008

    * J. Portugal Ramos Vila Santa Branco 2008 (VR)

    * Adega da Cartuxa Pera Manca White 2007  

Red

    * Quinta das Vinhas de Areia Fundação Oriente Ramisco 2005

    * Monte da Casteleja Maria Selection 2007

    * Monte d’Oiro Reserva 2006

    * Quinta dos Currais Reserva 2003

    * Filipa Pato Lokal Silex 2008

    * Luis Pato Vinha Barrosa 2005

    * Dao Sul Encontro 1 2007

    * Quinta da Dona Bairrada 2004

    * Quinta Vale das Escadinhas, Quinta da Falorca T-Nac 2007

    * Dão Sul Quinta de Cabriz Colheita Seleccionada 2007

    * Quinta da Pellada Tinto Reserva 2006

    * Vinha Paz Reserva 2005

    * Quinta dos Roques Garrafeira 2003

    * Quinta de S Jose Colheita 2007

    * CARM Quinta do Coa 2007

    * Quinta do Noval Cedro do Noval 2007

    * Quinta do Noval Labrador 2007

    * Niepoort Redoma 2007

    * Quinta do Passadouro Reserva Tinto 2007

    * Lemos & Van Zeller Curriculum Vitae "C.V" 2007

    * Quinta do Crasto Vinha de Ponte 2007

    * Quinta Macedos Pinga do Torto 2005

    * Alves de Sousa Abandonada Tinto 2005

    * Quinta do Crasto Reserva Vinhas Velhas 2004

    * Quinta do Vale Dona Maria 2004

    * Herdade dos Grous 23 Barricas 2008

    * Terrenus Tinto 2007

    * Herdade de São Miguel dos Descobridores Reserva 2007

    * Herdade do Esporão Private Selection Garrafeira Red 2007

    * Herdade do Rocim Grande Rocim 2007

    * Herdade da Malhadinha Nova Malhadinha Tinto 2007 (VR)

    * Herdade de Mouchão Tonel 3-4 2005

    * Quinta do Zambujeiro 2004

    * Quinta do Mouro 2004 

Moscatel

    * Quinta do Portal Late Harvest 2007

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