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The 7 wonders of Lisbon

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The 7 wonders of Lisbon

A few yers ago there was a worldwide internet vote to select the new seven wonders of the worls.The results were announced in Lisbon and that apparently inspired Portugal to conduct a popular vote for its own seven man-made wonders followed by another for the natural wonders.

In 2011 it was the “gastronomic wonders” vote, and one has to wonder which wonders are coming up next.

So we’ve made the list of Lisbon’s own marvels, a selection of what’s truly remarkable, outstanding or unique in the city.

1. BAIXA POMBALINA

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After the earthquake of 1755 destroyed all of central Lisbon, the city’s downtown was rebuilt following unprecedented state-of-the-art urban planning. This was before Haussmann’s redesign of Paris, using a neoclassical style (which became known as “Pombaline”) in a grid of streets. The structures of the buildings were built as a “cage” to make them earthquake-proof and each one was given modern sanitation — something quite rare throughout 18th-century Europe. It was the first time that anti-seismic design and prefabricated building methods were used in such a large scale in the world, and the strikingly modern, broad streets and squares were intended to serve as something of an 18th century shopping mall, each dedicated to a different craft (gold, silver, saddlery…)

Lisbon’s downtown is now recognized as Europe’s first great example of neoclassical design and urban planning, although an advanced state of decay has prevented it from being classified as a World Heritage Site.

2. MOSTEIRO DOS JERÓNIMOS

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With carvings inspired by India and other then-exotic lands, this World Heritage monument was built in the 16th century thanks to the riches pouring into Portugal from the East. Its extraordinary architecture is in the Manueline style unique to Portugal, and most magnificent of all is the stonework of the cloisters.

3. TORRE DE BELÉM

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This was just one of three towers that protected Lisbon’s harbor in the 16th century, including an almost-identical one across the river. This one survived the centuries, and although it looks more like a small fantasy castle for a princess, it was always used as a beacon for the city’s famous explorers. Its magnificent architectural details are reminders of the Age of Discovery and it’s protected as a World Heritage Site.

4. CAPELA S. JOÃO BAPTISTA - IGREJA DE SÃO ROQUE

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Built in the 16th century, this was one of the world’s first Jesuit churches, deceiving with a very plain façade but with a number of extraordinarily gilded and painted chapels inside. One of them (St. John the Baptist) is a unique masterpiece of European art which has become known as “the world’s most expensive chapel,” paid for with the gold discovered in Brazil (at the time a Portuguese colony). Built in Rome in 1742 using only the most precious gems (ivory, lapis lazulli, gold, silver, marble, gilt bronze, agate, porphyry…), the chapel was shipped to Lisbon to be assembled in this church where it can now be seen together with other seven side-chapels equally rich in ornamentation. Its most extraordinary feature is that its “paintings” are not paintings but actually very detailed mosaics!

5. COCHE DOS OCEANOS & COCHE DE LISBOA - MUSEU DOS COCHES

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While most royal carriages were destroyed over time in most European capitals (especially in Paris after the French Revolution), Portugal’s Queen Amélia had the visionary idea of preserving the ones in Portugal in a museum. Lisbon’s Carriages Museum is therefore now a unique collection in the world, and although there are a few carriages displayed in a couple of other cities such as Vienna, Lisbon’s stands out for assembling ceremonial and promenade vehicles from the 17th to the 19th centuries. It’s the world’s biggest collection, with most being the private property of the royal family.

The museum allows visitors to see the technical and artistic evolution of vehicles before the motor car, and the biggest wonders are the two magnificent ones used in an embassy to France’s Louis XIV and Pope Clement XI. They’re monumentally sculpted and represent the oceans and the glory of Lisbon.

6. MUSEU DO AZULEJO - CONVENTO DA MADRE DE DEUS

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Ceramic tile art is found all over the Mediterranean, but nowhere else in the world did it evolve as much or as imaginatively as in Portugal. Here, tiles became more than just geometric figures decorating walls, they also depicted historical and cultural images to cover palaces, street signs, and shops. There is only one place in the world where you can follow the history and evolution of this art form, and that’s Lisbon’s Tile Museum. Set in a magnificent 16th-century convent, this beautiful and unique gallery has a collection of tilework from as far back as Moorish times, and also presents modern examples by contemporary artists.

7. AQUEDUTO DAS ÁGUAS LIVRES

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The 1755 earthquake was able to destroy almost an entire city, but it was incapable of knocking down this monumental aqueduct. It stands today as it did in 1746 when it was completed and Lisbon finally able to have drinking water in practically every neighborhood, with reservoirs distributed through different parts of the city. These reservoirs are now used as exhibition spaces, especially the ones in Amoreiras and Principe Real, both part of the Water Museum.

With 109 arches (most in the Gothic style, and the tallest at a record-breaking 65m/213ft high) across a valley, Lisbon’s aqueduct is considered one of the world’s masterpieces of engineering of the Baroque period and one of the most remarkable hydraulic constructions of all time.

Source: Lisbon Lux

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THE 10 GREAT SUMMER ATTRACTIONS IN LISBON

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THE 10 GREAT SUMMER ATTRACTIONS IN LISBON

Visiting Lisbon in the warmer months should not be just another city break to see the cultural attractions of another European capital. It’s a truly unique and diverse destination, with countless spots to enjoy the sun and the higher temperatures on the beautiful, westernmost coast of Europe.

1. GUINCHO BEACH

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The largest and sandiest beach on the Lisbon riviera is windy but beautiful and never crowded. It also has some of Portugal’s best restaurants such as the Michelin-starred Fortaleza do Guincho and Porto de Santa Maria which has attracted celebrities like Brad Pitt and Bill Clinton. They all face the ocean, as do a couple of luxury hotels: Fortaleza do Guincho and the Quinta da Marinha resort.

2. PENA PARK

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When temperatures rise, cool down in the magical Pena Park in Sintra, home to Portugal’s most spectacular palace and to the haunting ruins of a Moorish castle. In between those two monuments are mansions and refreshing vegetation overlooking Europe’s westernmost coastline.

3. TAMARIZ BEACH

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Perhaps Portugal’s most famous beach in the 1950s when its castle illustrated countless postcards, it now suffers from overcrowding from tourists and suburban teenagers. The fact that it’s so easy to reach (with the train station right behind it, across from Europe’s biggest casino) doesn’t help, but it should still be your starting point for a search for a calm spot by the Atlantic. Walking west past the bars you’ll eventually find plenty of sand and calmer waters all for yourself, and just may end up following the pleasant boardwalk all the way to Cascais.

4. COSTA DA CAPARICA

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It’s not easy to reach by public transportation and in order to get to the best beaches on this 30-km coast south of the capital you’ll need a car. It’s Europe’s largest unbroken expanse of sand and you should avoid the overcrowded area around the town of Caparica, following the dunes to the beautiful and wild Fonte da Telha or Praia da Morena instead.

5. COMERCIO SQUARE

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Years of renovation gave Lisbon’s biggest square more pedestrian areas and new café terraces. Opening to the river and a wharf, it’s also where tourists sit to admire the estuary and 25 de Abril Bridge, with some even getting their feet wet. For refreshments and prolonged meals in the sun there are the cafés and restaurants.

6. THE WATERFRONT

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You could walk for about 45 minutes from Comércio Square, past Cais do Sodré to Belém along the waterfront, and find several cafés, restaurants and spots to sit in the sun. In between you’ll find the "beach" of Ribeira das Naus, and Docas de Santo Amaro, the docks with warehouses-turned-restaurants under 25 de Abril Bridge. Those who don’t feel like going to the beach but still want some time in the sun should simply follow the water.

7. THE TERRACES

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The top of Lisbon’s seven hills offer postcard-worthy views of the city and allow you to catch some sun. See this list of the best spots:The 10 Best Rooftop Bars and Terraces in Lisbon

8. PARQUE DO TEJO

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Created between 1995 and 1999 as a leisure area by Europe’s longest bridge, this waterfront park has the shade of over 15,000 trees and a large area for sitting in the sun. Perfect for a picnic or to rest after a walk along the waterfront past the city’s best contemporary architecture, it’s also used for working out, soccer games and open-air yoga

9. THE BIG PARKS

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Even locals don’t know about most of the green paradises in their city. Just above the main avenue is Edward VII Park which is much bigger than it looks at first sight, hiding a wonderful greenhouse by a lake. Then there are the secret gardens of Necessidades Park, usually mostly deserted with lots of space to lay in the sun. Even better is Europe’s largest urban forest on the edge of town, Monsanto. See the best green spots in the city here: 10 Beautiful Parks and Gardens

10. THE LONG NIGHTS

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Because the sun doesn’t set until just before 9PM in the summer, dinners in Lisbon often start at 10PM and drinks at way past midnight. The traditional nightlife neighborhood has been Bairro Alto but it now has serious competition down the hill in the seedy-cool Cais do Sodré district. Once the place for sailors to meet ladies of the night, it’s now where Lisbon meets for alternative music and lots of drinking on the street. The starting point for it all is Camões Square.

Source: Lisbon Lux

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The Lisbon Charms

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The Lisbon Charms

Lisboa's neighbourhoods of Belem, Alfama, Chiado and Baixa as well as the Paula Rego Museum in Cascais, are the five tourist attractions in the Portuguese capital recently elected by the Associated Press.

Bestowed with "a special charm" that attracts "more and more visitors", Lisboa has been featured in the international agency's free weekly travel guide published in early 2013. In the guide, the Associated Press (AP) reports that the city has a good offer for hikers, a peaceful way of life, low crime and lots of history. The agency also stresses the "famous Portuguese hospitality" and "exceptional seafood in restaurants."

In Belem, the AP highlights Jeronimos Monastery, the gardens and the maps of sea voyages along the riverside promenade. "The Portuguese like to think (of Belem) as the starting point [ground zero] of globalization," the agency says, noting that the Discoveries Monument pays tribute to Portuguese heroes like Vasco da Gama. The guide also mentions the "famous and irresistible Belem pastries," the 25 de Abril Bridge, which says it is very similar to the Golden Gate in San Francisco, USA, and the "giant statue of Christ that stands watch over the city from the south bank of the river."

In Alfama, AP praises the neighbourhood's typical streets "that ascend towards the castle, where archaeologists have found traces of occupation from the 7th century BC."

Downtown Lisboa, or the Baixa as its is locally known, is another of the free destinations that AP recommends a visit, having been rebuilt after the 1755 earthquake, in a "rare geometric pattern." In this area, the guide advises tourists to visit the antique shops and admire the black and white decorated cobblestone pavements.

In Chiado, described as a neighborhood of the 19th century Belle Époque, "when writers and artists gathered in cafés", highlights include the café "A Brasileira", with the statue of the Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa.

Finally, the AP guide praises Paula Rego, described as one of the most famous modern artists, and recommends a visit to the museum with her name, in Cascais, in the Lisboa Region.

Source: www.vivainportugal.pt

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